New Coin Ring “Re-REEDER” Tool Name and Update

Hey All,

Just a few quick updates from my last article:

I wanted to thank everyone who reached out to me with their name suggestions for the new coin ring tool that I am rolling out. The name that came up the most was the “Re-REEDER”, so that is what it will officially be called… I think that it’s catchy! 😉

With this new tool, you will be able to apply a set of reeds to the (thinner) punched side of just about any coin ring; as well as be able to “repair” the damaged or knicked US Mint reeded side of your coin rings by removing the US Mint reeded-side and re-applying the reeds to match those on the other side…

Talk about making your coin rings stand out!

Below are a few more pics of coins below that I recently “Re-REEDED” with the tool:

A clad Quarter, a Seated Liberty Half Dollar, and a Morgan Silver Dollar with the new reeds applied.

A clad Quarter, a Seated Liberty Half Dollar, and a Morgan Silver Dollar with the new reeds applied.

Here’s a closeup of the level of reeded detail achieved on the Morgan Dollar:

morgan-double-reeded-coin

double-reeded-coins2

Seated Liberty Half Dollar:

double-reeded-coins3

Even the clad quarter looks awesome!

quarter-double-reeded-coin

Lastly, many of you have asked when it would be available…my new “Re-REEDER” tool is in production now and it will be ready to drop next week!

So stay tuned; and you can always visit my Shop page where they will be found at: CoinRingUSA.com

Thanks!

  • Martin

 

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One thing that I’ve learned is that the coin ring-making craft is much like a fine wine: it gets better with time! The methods used get continuously refined and improved upon, turning the start-to-finish process of making a coin into a wearable piece of art both faster and easier.

One of the things that I’ve noticed is that as the level of quality of peoples’ coin rings improves, it can become more challenging to differentiate your finished work from someone else’s; especially if you are choosing to sell them online.

So I began working on a new coin ring-finishing tool a few months ago that was borne from an idea that a relative of mine gave me who commented on how cool it would be if BOTH sides of a coin ring had the reeded edges on it. Hmmmm….

  • So what I came up with is a new tool that will (easily and quickly) put the “reeds” on the thinner cut-side of your coin; giving your ring a more symmetrical, refined and finished look. This tool will also give you the option of being able to put a “fresh set” of reeds back onto a coin that either has well-worn reeds from age and circulation, has knicks/damaged reeds, etc. Just lightly sand or file off the old reeds and re-apply!

I’ve completed the R&D and finishing up the prototyping on the new tool and it will be going into production shortly and made publicly available. So without giving away too much; here’s a few pictures below of a finished American Silver Eagle that now has double-sided reeded edges:

coin-ring-reed-er-tool6-3

coin-ring-reed-er-tool2-2

You’ll be able to find this and all of my other coin ring tools at: CoinRingUSA.com

Lastly, I’m taking suggestions for a possible name for this tool. A fellow coin-ringer tossed out the name: the “RE-EDger”… but that name is already trademarked by another Co… which is too bad; as it had a nice ring to it!   😉

I came up with: the “REED-er” as a possible name for this tool. Let me know your thoughts on a name and what you think of the reeded edge look on both sides of the ring in the pics, thanks!

  • Martin

The BEST Way to Protect your Folding Tools BEFORE Folding to Make a Coin Ring

So you’ve selected the coin that you’d like to make into a coin ring, you’ve annealed and center-punched a hole into it, and you’re ready to begin folding it down into a reduction die.

BEFORE doing so, you want to make sure that you protect the surfaces of your folding cones from premature wear and tear; and one of the BEST ways to do so is by beveling, or ROUNDING OUT the 90° edges on the top and bottom of the center-punched hole in your coin.

Center hole in coin

Notice the 90° sharp edges on the inside of the hole in the coin just prior to deburring.

 

You can accomplish this process best by using a tool called a “deburring tool” that can be purchased online at Amazon.com for example for less than $10.00. One example of a deburring tool can be found below:

Center hole in coin3

Deburring Tool purchased from Amazon.com for less than $10.00

 

You grip the deburring tool in one hand and the coin in the other, and with nice and even strokes; begin to work your way around BOTH sides of the coin, keeping an even amount of pressure all the way around the hole.

Center hole in coin4

Close-up of the deburring blade

 

A beveled and softened hole in a Walking Liberty Half Dollar, ready for folding:

Center hole in coinCLOSE UP

No more sharp edges and ready for folding!

Even after you’ve softened the inside edges of the hole in your coin by beveling, another trick to further lengthen the work-life of your folding cones is to START your first fold with something called a Stainless Steel “Starter Cone”, which helps to eliminate the perpendicular edge to the coin where it meets the surface of the folding cone, (which is at that point where the most amount of wear will occur to the surface of your folding cone(s). Another added benefit to deburring the hole is that you eliminate any micro-tears that may have been created by punching a hole.

If you own a set of my “Stabilizing” Reduction Dies, you’ll need to start the folding process with a Stainless Steel Starting Cone. The reason being is that there is not enough initial clearance for the folding cone to fit under the ram head and your coin prior to the folding process.

You can visit my Shop Page here to pick up a Stainless Steel Starter Cone

You’re now ready to further fold your coin over!

To see a quick video tutorial on this topic, click here

Grab a set here of the New and Improved Universal Stabilizing Folding Cones

Tips for protecting your coin ring’s detail while forging it

What’s the best way to protect the inner and outer detail of my coin while I’m making it into a coin ring?

This is a question that I recently received from a customer of mine. There are some simple ways to protect your coin ring’s inner and outer detail while you’re forging it. In my own practice, I have 3 different tools that I can use when initially folding over, expanding, and then reducing the coin into a reduction die for final shaping:

1. A Ring Sizing Machine
This is my personal favorite.
A Durston ring sizing machine

A Durston ring sizing machine

2. A 1-ton Arbor Press
A Harbor Freight 1-ton arbor press

A Harbor Freight 1-ton arbor press

3. A 12-ton Shop Press (this is definitely way more press than you will ever need to use to make a coin ring; as you can easily use the 6-ton “A-frame” tabletop shop press from Harbor Freight if you want to).
12-ton Harbor Freight shop press

12-ton Harbor Freight shop press

Goal: to keep the reeded edge intact!
The outer reeded edge of Morgan Silver Dollars

The outer reeded edge of Morgan Silver Dollars

The best way to protect the inner detail of the coin as you begin to fold it down into your reduction die is to use the New and Improved Folding Cones. This method of folding leaves no marks, scratches, or marring, thus preserving 100% of the detail on the inside of the coin. (See photos below for reference):
Folding Cone pic COPY

Using a New Folding Cone to fold an American Silver Eagle with a Ring Sizer Machine

Improved Universal Folding Cones and Spacer Set, available for purchase at: www.FoldingCones.com

Improved Universal Folding Cones and Spacer Set, available for purchase at: http://www.FoldingCones.com

To purchase a Set of the 4 Universal Folding Cones and Spacer Kit, go to: www.FoldingCones.com

The key to protecting the outer edges of the coin ring as you’re reducing it is to use some impact-resistant plastic tape, which works very well in that it provides a buffer between the edge of the coin and either the ram head on your ring sizing machine, the press arm on a shop press, or the square ram on a 1-ton arbor press.

Below is a picture of my “Durston” Ring Sizing machine. Notice the thin grey layer of impact-resistant protective tape covering the ram head, (directly on top of the plastic bearing ball). This is what acts as a “buffer” and protects the outer edge of the coin that is facing UP from the reduction die as you are reducing it for shaping or final sizing of the coin ring.

Stabilizing Reduction Die pic

The impact-resistant tape (shown by the red arrows below), is also great for covering the bare metal on the expanding splines of the ring-sizing machine. This acts as a barrier between the inner side of the coin that is making contact as you are expanding it down the splines; also leaving no marks, scratches, or marring; thus protecting the inner detail of the coin ring as a result. (See photo below:)

Impact-resistant tape on the splines of my ring sizing machine.

Impact-resistant tape on the splines of my ring sizing machine.

Below is an example of the crisp inner detail of a finished proof 1975 Half Dollar from the country of Belize that I recently made for a customer, using the impact-resistant tape and the plastic bearing balls.

If you use these simple tools, your coin rings will turn out with striking detail!


Visit my Shop Page for all of the highest quality coin ring-making tools that I have to offer.

 

Belize Coin inner detail

Belize Coin inner detail

Three easy ways to get sized for your coin ring!

Before making a coin ring for someone, it’s important to make sure that you know what size their finger is that they plan to wear the coin ring on.

The best way to accurately know that is to have a set of ring sizing gauges like the set shown below on hand. When I run into someone that comments on my coin ring that I wear, and they express an interest on wanting one for themselves, I pull out my set of ring sizing gauges and instantly I know what size to make their coin ring. Not only does it take the guess-work out of it, but you’re eliminating an extra step for people who might otherwise forget to get their finger sized; and you might lose an opportunity to sell them a coin ring as a result of that.

ring sizing gauges
These metal gauges can be purchased on eBay or Amazon for under $10.00, and can accurately size your finger. Just search for the term “Ring Sizing Gauge”.

If you don’t want to purchase one or have to carry it around, you can always tell the person that you’re speaking with to go to their local jewelry store to get their finger sized, or they can go to a big-box store like WalMart or Target and ask to get their finger sized at the jewelry counter. They will provide that service at no charge.

Lastly as another ring-sizing option, I have included a free Ring Sizer Sheet below. To access it, simply CLICK on the document below to print it, follow the simple steps, and you will be able to measure your or someone else’s finger with it!

Ring_Sizer Sheet

Click on the image to print