The ULTIMATE Way to Get Smooth and Rounded Edges to the Rough Cut Side of Coin Rings!

Clean up and smooth-out your coin rings’ rough cut edges!

There’s a lot of information available today on how to fold and reduce coins to make coin rings, but there’s almost no information on HOW to actually go about and professionally finish and polish the thinner, non-reeded cut edge of your coin rings.

This side of the coin ring was once the inner portion of the coin prior to the forging process, and it can be very difficult to get a smooth-looking finish due to the sharp and uneven edges that are present.

Polishing Mandrel Set pic ROUGH COPY

Rough and uneven coin ring edge BEFORE using the Finishing & Polishing Mandrel Set

An easy solution to this problem is to utilize a Set of what are called “Finishing and Polishing Mandrels”; which will give you that high-quality smooth finish and shine to the NON-REEDED edges of your coin rings by getting rid of those unsightly, uneven, sharp edges WITHOUT using nail buffing files, having to sand by hand, using steel round files, or even deburring tools.

This Polishing Mandrel Set will finish and polish any coin ring from an approximate US size of 5, up to a US size of 14.

The Kit comes with a German-made nickel plated steel shank complete with 3 interchangeable Tapered Mandrel Cones in varying sizes:

Small — (fits ring sizes of approx. 5-8),
Medium — (fits ring sizes of approx. 8.5-11), and
Large — (fits ring sizes of approx. 11-14).

Polishing Mandrel pic2COPY
The advantage to using the finishing and polishing mandrels is that as the ring is spinning, the power drill acts like a small lathe, providing a much more uniform finish to the ring than can be achieved with either hand-sanding, using a nail buffing file, a steel round-file, or even a small rotary tool such as a Dremel.

 

*** TO WATCH A VIDEO TUTORIAL ON THIS PROCESS, WATCH THE VIDEO BELOW ***

 

PROCESS:

1.) Determine which size Polishing Tapered Mandrel fits your completed coin ring, and slide the coin ring on to it.

2.) Place the Mandrel bit into your power drill and tighten.

3.) Adjust the coin ring until it’s well-balanced with no “wobbling” on the Mandrel with your power drill on, and then expand the Mandrel by tightening the Stainless Steel Phillips head set screw at the top which holds the coin ring securely in place.

4.) Begin on the outer edge of the coin ring with the coarser 100 Grit sandpaper and work your way around to the inner edge of the coin ring; making sure that ONLY the corner tip of the sandpaper is making contact with the unfinished inner, top, and outer edges of your coin ring to prevent damage to the rings’ detail.

5.) Continue to work the inner, top, and outer edges of the NON-REEDED side using the finer Grits of sandpaper as you go; finishing with “0000” Steel Wool. You can also use the steel wool and LIGHTLY go over the inner and the outer detail of the coin ring before you either polish it with a jeweler’s cloth or after you’ve put a patina (antique-looking) finish on the ring.

6.) The final step is to use a jeweler’s cloth to both buff and finish-polish your coin ring.

Your ring will now have a highly-smoothed, rounded, and polished edge on the NON-REEDED side that is not often seen on coin rings!

Smooth and even coin edge AFTER using the Finishing & Polishing Mandrel Set

Smooth and even coin ring edge AFTER using the Finishing & Polishing Mandrel Set

 

Another example below:

Before AND After COPY of finished coin rings

* Click on the photo to enlarge to see the differences in the edges of this Walking Liberty Half Dollar *

Other materials needed: a power drill, 3 different grits of sandpaper (150 Grit, 400 Grit, and 600 Grit ideally), some “0000” Steel Wool, and a jeweler’s polishing cloth to complete this process. Those items can be purchased from Amazon.com; at a big box store like Home Depot, or any local hardware store inexpensively.

 

*** SAFETY FIRST ***
– Always wear safety glasses and work gloves.
– Always use caution when working with any power tools and electricity.
– Keep fingers, long hair, and loose clothing away from any fast moving parts.

Tips for protecting your coin ring’s detail while forging it

What’s the best way to protect the inner and outer detail of my coin while I’m making it into a coin ring?

This is a question that I recently received from a customer of mine. There are some simple ways to protect your coin ring’s inner and outer detail while you’re forging it. In my own practice, I have 3 different tools that I can use when initially folding over, expanding, and then reducing the coin into a reduction die for final shaping:

1. A Ring Sizing Machine
This is my personal favorite.
A Durston ring sizing machine

A Durston ring sizing machine

2. A 1-ton Arbor Press
A Harbor Freight 1-ton arbor press

A Harbor Freight 1-ton arbor press

3. A 12-ton Shop Press (this is definitely way more press than you will ever need to use to make a coin ring; as you can easily use the 6-ton “A-frame” tabletop shop press from Harbor Freight if you want to).
12-ton Harbor Freight shop press

12-ton Harbor Freight shop press

Goal: to keep the reeded edge intact!
The outer reeded edge of Morgan Silver Dollars

The outer reeded edge of Morgan Silver Dollars

The best way to protect the inner detail of the coin as you begin to fold it down into your reduction die is to use the New and Improved Folding Cones. This method of folding leaves no marks, scratches, or marring, thus preserving 100% of the detail on the inside of the coin. (See photos below for reference):
Folding Cone pic COPY

Using a New Folding Cone to fold an American Silver Eagle with a Ring Sizer Machine

Improved Universal Folding Cones and Spacer Set, available for purchase at: www.FoldingCones.com

Improved Universal Folding Cones and Spacer Set, available for purchase at: http://www.FoldingCones.com

To purchase a Set of the 4 Universal Folding Cones and Spacer Kit, go to: www.FoldingCones.com

The key to protecting the outer edges of the coin ring as you’re reducing it is to use some impact-resistant plastic tape, which works very well in that it provides a buffer between the edge of the coin and either the ram head on your ring sizing machine, the press arm on a shop press, or the square ram on a 1-ton arbor press.

Below is a picture of my “Durston” Ring Sizing machine. Notice the thin grey layer of impact-resistant protective tape covering the ram head, (directly on top of the plastic bearing ball). This is what acts as a “buffer” and protects the outer edge of the coin that is facing UP from the reduction die as you are reducing it for shaping or final sizing of the coin ring.

Stabilizing Reduction Die pic

The impact-resistant tape (shown by the red arrows below), is also great for covering the bare metal on the expanding splines of the ring-sizing machine. This acts as a barrier between the inner side of the coin that is making contact as you are expanding it down the splines; also leaving no marks, scratches, or marring; thus protecting the inner detail of the coin ring as a result. (See photo below:)

Impact-resistant tape on the splines of my ring sizing machine.

Impact-resistant tape on the splines of my ring sizing machine.

Below is an example of the crisp inner detail of a finished proof 1975 Half Dollar from the country of Belize that I recently made for a customer, using the impact-resistant tape and the plastic bearing balls.

If you use these simple tools, your coin rings will turn out with striking detail!


Visit my Shop Page for all of the highest quality coin ring-making tools that I have to offer.

 

Belize Coin inner detail

Belize Coin inner detail

4 things to look for when buying Reduction Dies to make coin rings

People often ask me questions relating to reduction dies, which are a critical component necessary when making coin rings. Reduction, (also known as “compression” or “reducer” dies), are conically-pitched (or cone-shaped) pieces of round steel that are used in the process of folding over and then reducing coins to make into coin rings.

Oftentimes, people aren’t familiar with the best places to go to get these reduction dies, or the proper questions to ask the person offering them before making their purchase.

Here are a few key points to remember asking before buying any reduction dies. The following four components should be in place if you want to have reduction dies that will give you both long-term usage and better wear-and-tear resistance:

 

Question #1: are the dies made from wear-resistant and hardened stainless steel?
The Hardened Stainless Steel that I use is very tough, durable, and has some of the best wear and rust-resistance than most other types of metal that people are choosing to use.

I work with machinists who are true craftsmen at their trade and they are able to produce an ultra smooth, mirror-like finish to the inner die wall faces that allows for the least amount of friction and therefore easier reduction of even the largest and toughest coins. If you look closely at most others’ dies, you can see somewhat of a rough finish on the face of the dies, which can adversely affect their use.

 

 

Question #2: are the inner walls of the reduction dies fine-smoothed and polished?
This is a critical aspect of having a quality reduction die that shouldn’t be overlooked. Having an ultra smooth inner die-wall finish, (which is the part of the die that makes contact with the outer edge of the coin that you are either folding or reducing), allows for minimal friction and force needed to forge the coin. Damage to the outer reeded edge of the coin isn’t likely to occur as a result either.

Below is a close-up photograph of a one-sided reduction die that has a very rough and scored inner die wall finish; as seen by the heavy tooling and score marks by the red arrows:

Heavy tool marks and scoring by the red arrows on this poorly-machined one-sided reduction die

Heavy tool marks and scoring by the red arrows on this poorly machined one-sided reduction die

CoinRingUSA’s reduction dies are some of the smoothest, finely finished and highest-quality dies available today on the market:

This leads to the next important question to ask…

Question #3: are the reduction dies precision CNC-machined?
You may or may not have heard of this term before, but the “CNC” in machining is an abbreviation for “Computer Numerical Control”. It simply means that computers control the use and operation of manufacturing tools such as mills, lathes, routers and grinders.

The key benefit to this is that it produces the exact same result each and every time. Even the best human operator will have small variations between finished results, whereas a CNC machine will produce exactly the same result every time it is run.

Where this can come into play with the reduction dies is having the ability to machine the exact same inner die wall pitch throughout all of the dies; down to thousandths of an inch consistently every time. The reduction dies that I offer are all precision CNC-machined.

 

Question #4: are the universal reduction dies double-sided?
This is mainly an issue of time, skill level, and cost to the person making the dies. (*** With the exception of the new “Swedish Wrap” extrusion dies that are single-sided), the issue with the photo below of a 1-sided reduction die is that it becomes difficult to continue folding over and reducing a coin, due to the fact that you only have one size diameter die opening to work with. You’ll often end up buying multiple 1-sided reduction dies if you go this route.

notice the conical shape of the die extends all the way from the top to the bottom of this 1-sided die

Notice that the conical pitch of the inner wall extends all the way from the top to the bottom of this 1-sided die

It’s much better to have a set of double-sided reduction dies that follow what I call a “Pairing Order”, which is simply having dies that have diameter sizes in sequential descending order, such as a die with a 1.4″ inch diameter opening on one side, and then a 1.3″ inch diameter opening on the other side of the same reduction die.

In the sizing example above, you would simply flip the die over after you’ve folded the coin over on the 1.4″ inch side, and begin folding the same coin down into the 1.3″ inch diameter side of your reduction die. This makes the task of coin ring-making so much more effective and time-efficient; as you in essence have “2-dies-in-1”.

All of the reduction dies that I offer are double-sided with the sizes precision-engraved on each corresponding side for easy identification, as shown below:


Lastly, the picture below is of a coin ring that I made recently using the double-sided reduction dies. Notice the amount of outer detail that has remained intact as well as the condition of the outer reeded-edge portion of the coin:

If you make sure that all of the aspects above are covered when purchasing your reduction dies, you will have coin ring tools that will produce a beautifully-finished coin ring that will last you a long time.


To see and purchase the Reduction Dies that I offer, click here.

If you don’t see a particular item that you’re looking for such as the specialty reduction dies or the coin center punch tool, it’s because I am temporarily out of stock due to high demand. If that happens, please reach out to me by clicking on the “Contact” tab in the upper right-hand corner and I will get back to you as soon as I am restocked, thanks!

Three easy ways to get sized for your coin ring!

Before making a coin ring for someone, it’s important to make sure that you know what size their finger is that they plan to wear the coin ring on.

The best way to accurately know that is to have a set of ring sizing gauges like the set shown below on hand. When I run into someone that comments on my coin ring that I wear, and they express an interest on wanting one for themselves, I pull out my set of ring sizing gauges and instantly I know what size to make their coin ring. Not only does it take the guess-work out of it, but you’re eliminating an extra step for people who might otherwise forget to get their finger sized; and you might lose an opportunity to sell them a coin ring as a result of that.

ring sizing gauges
These metal gauges can be purchased on eBay or Amazon for under $10.00, and can accurately size your finger. Just search for the term “Ring Sizing Gauge”.

If you don’t want to purchase one or have to carry it around, you can always tell the person that you’re speaking with to go to their local jewelry store to get their finger sized, or they can go to a big-box store like WalMart or Target and ask to get their finger sized at the jewelry counter. They will provide that service at no charge.

Lastly as another ring-sizing option, I have included a free Ring Sizer Sheet below. To access it, simply CLICK on the document below to print it, follow the simple steps, and you will be able to measure your or someone else’s finger with it!

Ring_Sizer Sheet

Click on the image to print